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We can’t change educational outcomes without addressing the root cause

In order to envision a future that is different from the present we have to change the conversation and the approach to improve educational and life outcomes for black males.

Huddle Up brings together district level administrators, school level leaders, teachers, parents, community organizations, community leaders and law enforcement to change the perception of what a future can look like for black males. Read more.

Huddle Up, a Driving Force Group partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, recognizes the painful reality that young, black men in America have to overcome tremendous obstacles just to make it to the same starting line as their peers.

Huddle Up starts early, focusing on community and school engagement for boys in grades K-3, in order to target the black male achievement gap at its root. By bringing together leaders in the school, law enforcement, and parenting communities to honestly assess conditions, Huddle Up is able to promote policies and programs that lift up black males and help put an end to those that hold them back. The ultimate goal is to create the sense of trust, hope, well-being and belonging that each and every student deserves.

Huddle Up’s goal is to improve the educational outcomes for African American males beginning in the early, formative years of school by improving relationships between schools, family and community  and ensuring a sense of trust, hope, well-being and belonging for our most vulnerable, yet critically valuable members of our society…black males.

Huddle Up has launched in Kansas City and Baltimore City during the 2016-2017 school year. 

Please click on the image to visit Huddle Up Kansas City

Please click on the image to visit Huddle Up Kansas City

Please click on the image to visit Huddle Up Baltimore

Please click on the image to visit Huddle Up Baltimore

  1. Districts must help bring other necessary stakeholders to the table (law enforcement, community leaders, families, teachers, other critical partners).                                                                          
  2. All stakeholders must commit to honesty around identifying, articulating, disrupting, and confronting racial inequity issues especially as they relate to educational access and quality.                                     
  3. Commit to using previously collected district data to understand and identify school and district challenges, opportunities, trends and patterns as well as use data to document a complex path of organizational transformation. This includes data related to; academics, attendance, behavior, social/emotional well-being, race, socioeconomic status, gender and home language. In addition, it will be important to note if data is centralized, or disparate across departments and what the best way to collect and use that data is moving forward.   
  4. Conducting an organizational and systems audit focused on existing frameworks, structures, policies, and resources around community and family engagement.  Being willing to enhance and accelerate what works and discard what is not working, even if they are policies or programs that have been in existence for a long time.